Tips & Tricks: 13 quick fixes for when your phone starts overheating this summer

 

Be careful using your phone in direct sunlight.

By Madison Vanderburg of thisinsider.com

If you’ve ever had a smartphone, chances are that you’ve had to deal with it overheating. It’s a common issue that’s worse in the summer when the temperatures outside start rising.

According to AndroidPit.com, “smartphones have to physically move things around to work at all, so they have to generate heat.

The amount of heat your smartphone produces is largely proportional to the amount of electricity moving through it.”
This combined with the hot summer sun can cause your phone to overheat.

Here are 13 quick fixes for when you’re smartphone just can’t take the heat.

Only charge your phone’s battery to 80%.

 

Don’t do a full charge

First off, if you must charge your phone overnight, keep it on a cool, flat surface rather than a pillow or bedsheet. But you shouldn’t be charging to your phone to 100% anyways, according to Android Pit— constantly doing a full recharge will shorten the battery’s lifespan. Your phone is more likely to overheat when it’s at a full charge, so charge it when it drops to near 30% and unplug it once it reaches an 80% charge.

Avoid exposing the phone to direct sunlight.

Keep your Tech out of the sun!

This one is self-explanatory — don’t leave your phone on a chair by the pool in direct sunlight for an entire afternoon.

Always close unused apps.

If you’re not using an app — close it.

Your phone works overtime when you have multiple apps open at the same time (this includes open web browser tabs), so get in the habit of closing unused apps periodically. Also, close apps (especially graphics-heavy apps like games) when you charge your phone. Android-users recommend the app Greenify because it automatically puts unused apps into hibernation and conserves power overall.

Turn the brightness down.

Having your phone on full-brightness depletes its battery.

 

Turn your brightness down, especially when you are using the phone outside. If you have a hard time seeing the screen with the brightness low, invest in an anti-glare screen.

Keep apps up-to-date.

Avoid a glitchy phone by updating your apps.

Keep your iOS and your apps up to date because there could be a glitchy bug in an old update that, once fixed, will make your phone operate smoother, according to P Safe.

Don’t be an app hoarder.

These little things can prevent your phone from working to hard.

Delete functions and apps you don’t use. This also includes turning off push notifications, turning off apps that are running in the background, and disabling location services from certain apps.

 

Utilize airplane mode.

If you’re not using your phone, it should be on airplane mode.

 

If you’re at the beach or planning to be outdoors for many hours, turn your phone off or put it on airplane mode. Why burn through your phone’s power when you aren’t really using it?

Ration the Bluetooth.

Disable your phone’s auto-connect while driving.

Try to avoid using Bluetooth for extended periods of time, and make sure you’ve disconnected from Bluetooth once you’re done using it. If your phone auto connects to Bluetooth in your car, disconnect the auto-pairing — especially if you aren’t planning on speaking on the phone or listening to a podcast that day.

Install an antivirus software if you have an Android phone.

It’s possible your Android has a virus.

If you have an Android and your phone is overheating, it could mean that you have a virus. Android phones are susceptible to malware, so eliminate that option entirely by installing anti-virus software on your phone.

Take a break from playing games.

Is it really important to finish that game?

If your phone is already prone to overheating, maybe cool it on playing games and definitely make sure the game isn’t still running in the background after you’ve finished playing.

Take off the case.

The case will only make the phone hotter.

If your phone is already hot, take off the phone’s case in an attempt to cool it down.

Check the charging cable.

A faulty charging cable could be to blame.

If your phone is overheating while you charge it, it could be that there’s an issue with the charging cable. Try swapping it out first and see if that fixes the issue.

The camera could be the culprit.

Try not to use the camera too much.

 

Search “phone overheats camera” and you’ll find hundreds of message boards dedicated to this wildly common problem. This kind of overheating typically happens when you attempt to take a long-form video. So if your phone is overheating and you’ve been filming something for the last five minutes, stop filming, and close the camera app.

 

Do you have any tips for keep your phone cool when the weather is uber hot? Sound off in the comments below!

How to: Monitor Your iPhone Battery Health from your iPhone

 

By Jeff Gamet of The Mac Observer

Now that we know Apple controls device performance on older iPhones to avoid battery-related issues, maybe it’s time to pay closer attention to your battery’s health. You can do that easily from your iPhone or your Mac. Read on to learn how.
IPhones with older batteries were shutting off without warning, so Apple addressed the problem by essentially slowing down the processor. The issue was that the occasional peak power spike the processor needed over taxed batteries that couldn’t hold a full charge any longer. By spreading the processor requests over more cycles the battery strain was reduced and the phones stopped randomly shutting off.

If you want to track your battery’s overall health so you know what to expect from your iPhone’s performance you can do that from your phone or your Mac, and it doesn’t have to cost any money.

Checking Your iPhone Battery Health on Your Phone

If you want to monitor your iPhone’s overall battery health from your phone check out Battery Life. The app shows your current charge, wear level, and run time. You can see your charge history, too. If you don’t want to see adds and think additional data in the Today widget and Apple Watch app would be handy, that’s a US$1.99 in-app purchase.

 

 

Checking Your iPhone Battery Health on Your Mac

You can monitor your iPhone’s battery health from your Mac with coconutBattery. The app is popular staying on top of your Mac’s battery and it’s also great for seeing how your iPhone and iPad battery is holding up. You’ll need to connect your iPhone to your Mac’s USB port to see your phone’s charge and overall capacity, plus you can see details like model number, serial number, and manufacture date. coconutBattery is free and you can upgrade to coconutBattery Plus with additional device data for $9.95.

Apple isn’t saying what it’s threshold is for reducing performance for weak batteries, but anecdotally it looks like when your battery won’t charge beyond 80% of original capacity you’ll see the change. That number comes from several Reddit users saying that’s when they noticed their iPhone got slower, so if nothing else it’s a nice marker point for watching to see if your performance degrades.

What’s your best practices for monitoring your devices battery life? Tell ua about it in the comments below!

How to: Reset your Brightness in iOS 11

Apple doesn’t want you to set your own brightness in iOS 11

 

By Napier Lopez of the Next Web

It seems there are still a few small surprises in store for Apple’s iOS 11, and not all of them good: the latest developer beta of the OS makes it a pain to manually set brightness.

Previously, you could toggle automatic brightness on and off right from the Display & Brightness section of Settings – you know, where it should be. Now the option is buried all the way under General>Accessibility>Display Accommodations, where pretty much no-one will find it.

To be clear, Apple’s version of auto-brightness does allow for some flexibility. Similar to adaptive brightness on Android, you still get a brightness slider, but instead of setting a fixed brightness, it roughly establishes a brightness range.

The idea is that even if you set your brightness low, the screen will still brighten when you step outside into the sunlight. But sometimes auto brightness gets it wrong, and the subtle adjustments in brightness can be annoying for some activities like watching a long movie.

Sure, it’s a bit of nitpicking. For most people, auto-brightness is fine. But I frequently alternate between auto and manual brightness depending on what I’m doing, and I’m not the only one. Moreover, there’s just no reason to bury such an inoffensive and commonly used setting under several non-intuitive menus.

Do you have work arounds for automated settings on your device? Tell us about it in the comments below!

Tips & Tricks: 5 ways to boost your MacBook battery life

 

Photo: picjumbo.com/Pexels CC
Save yourself some battery power when you go remote.

 

 

5 ways to boost your MacBook battery life

Jovan Washington of Cult of Mac

Despite the MacBook’s svelte design, their batteries last a long time because Apple put a lot of thought into how the hardware and software work together. Still, if you find yourself running out of juice, some simple changes can help you extend your MacBook battery life.

Apple designs its laptops to maximize user productivity and minimize extra work, but following these simple tips will boost MacBook battery life considerably.

HOW TO BOOST MACBOOK BATTERY LIFE

While your MacBook’s battery life totally depends on what you’re doing on any given day, making small sacrifices can pay off big time. (See Apple’s specs listings to see exactly how much screen time you can hope to attain.)
These tips should boost your MacBook battery life noticeably.

TURN DOWN MACBOOK SCREEN BRIGHTNESS

Screenshot: Cult of Mac
Decrease the brightness levels on your MacBook to save battery power.

Apple’s Retina display is pretty adaptive and vibrant even at low brightness settings. In most conditions, you can turn down your brightness settings — especially if you are not accessing highly visual content — to extend your battery life.

Go to System Preferences > Displays. In the Display tab, move the Brightness slider to the left and uncheck Automatically adjust brightness.

SWITCH OFF BLUETOOTH AND WI-FI

If what you’re doing doesn’t require Bluetooth and/or Wi-Fi, turn them off. These two laptop mainstays can eat up a big chunk of your battery without you realizing it. Ask yourself, “Do I really need to be connected to Wi-Fi if all I’m doing is working on a spreadsheet?” Switch off your Bluetooth and Wi-Fi when not in use.

  • To switch off Bluetooth, go to System Preferences > Bluetooth and then select Turn Bluetooth Off.
  • To switch off Wi-Fi, go to System Preferences > Network and select Turn Wi-Fi Off.

 

DISCONNECT PERIPHERALS

Believe it or not, keeping a compact disk inserted or USB device connected consumes significant MacBook battery power. While on the move, even the slightest of battery wastage can prove to be a heavy blow and reduce overall performance. Always disconnect any peripherals to conserve and extend laptop battery life.

TURN OFF BACKLIT KEYBOARD

Having a light-up keyboard definitely proves convenient in certain situations, but you only really need it in dim lighting. Turning off your backlit keyboard will extend the battery life of your MacBook.

 

INVERT COLORS

Screenshot: Cult of Mac
Select this option to give you a bizarre view of your desktop while saving battery life.

Designed for people with limited vision, this option saves MacBook battery by displaying energy-saving black pixels rater than juice-devouring white ones. If you can stand the pain of working in such a stark environment, this is a good way to get more from your Mac’s battery.

BONUS MACBOOK BATTERY TIPS

Screenshot: Cult of Mac
Safari is using significant energy.

MacOS helpfully informs you if any apps use significant amounts of power. Just look in the Battery menu. Click on Battery in the Menu bar and check under Apps Using Significant Energy. Safari is the culprit in the example above. But you should quit any hungry apps and use a low-energy alternative instead.

You can also get more detailed information on energy usage using the Activity Monitor app.

1. Launch the Activity Monitor app.
2. Click on the Energy Tab and Energy Impact header to view the apps and processes taking up the most power on your Mac.

Also, check the following options in System Preferences > Energy Saver:

  • Put the hard disk(s) to sleep when possible.
  • Slightly dim the display when using this power source.
  • Automatically reduce brightness before display goes to sleep.
  • Disable Power Nap.

Those quick changes can boost Mac battery life considerably.

Do you have any tips for preserving battery life on your laptop? Share them with us in the comments below!

How To: Save Your iPhone Battery Life; 5 Quick Tips

 

 

 

BY RISHABH JAIN of ibtimes.com

The battery life of an iPhone is something even Apple aficionados complain about. With more and more applications being available for the device, increased use of its camera and background task-supporting applications such as Siri, battery life consumption also increases.

Here are 5 tips that could help you save battery life on your iPhone:

Turn off “Hey Siri”:

The iPhone’s voice assistant Siri is always keen to listen to you. By default, it keeps working on the iPhone in the background, which means it also consumes battery. In case you don’t have the need for it, you can actually turn it off. To do so, navigate to Settings > General> Siri or Settings > Siri and then just switch the feature off. 

Stop apps from refreshing in the background

Background App Refresh is a machine-learning feature, which helps apps learn when you frequently check them.

It allows them to predict when you will check them next and lets them be prepared with the latest data. Since these apps run in the background, the feature uses battery. You can turn it off by navigating to Settings > General > Background App Refresh and switching it off.

Start reducing screen brightness manually

Auto-brightness on the iPhone is a handy feature, but it again takes a lot of battery.

It is advisable to set the brightness manually according to your needs. To set the maximum value of screen brightness available to the feature, you will need to navigate to Settings > Display & Brightness and reduce the brightness using the slider.

Disable dynamic backgrounds

Dynamic backgrounds is a motion-based feature present in iOS devices — they are wallpapers that provide the user with the feeling of a little motion in them. In case you don’t have use for this feature, you can disable it by navigating to Settings > Wallpaper and choosing a wallpaper without such effects like the ones in the “Stills” section.

Disable motion effects

iPhone users might be aware of the screen motion effect, which provides icons with visual depth but also eats into the battery. To turn it off, you can navigate to Settings > General > Accessibility > Reduce motion.

What tips do you have for making your iPhone battery last longer? Tell us in the comments below.

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