App of the Week: Gmail Archived Mail

What It Is and How to Use It?

 

Need to save that email? Try archiving it

By Scott Orgera of Lifewire.com

We live in a world of seemingly endless emails; many of us send and receive a ton of emails every day. Whether it be for professional or personal purposes, our inboxes can eventually become a cluttered repository of disarray.

While many of these emails are disposable, there are some you may want to keep for future reference. No matter the motive, storing everything in your inbox can become problematic for a number of reasons.

What is the Gmail Archive?

Rather than deleting an email and losing it for good, you can choose to archive it instead. As soon as a message is placed in the Gmail archive, it is removed from your inbox and tagged with the label “All Mail.” These messages remain within your Gmail account and can be easily retrieved at a later time, but for now they are out of sight and out of mind.

Note: If someone replies to an archived message, it’s automatically returned to your inbox.  

How to Archive Email

Sending a message to your Gmail archive is very easy, so much so that many people often mistakenly archive emails by clicking on or tapping the wrong option. For more information on how to retrieve archived messages, visit our step-by-step tutorial.

Archiving Emails on a Computer

  • 1 To archive a message on a computer, first access the Gmail interface via your preferred web browser (Google Chrome is recommended).
  • 2 Select the email or emails that you wish to archive by clicking on their accompanying checkbox(es) so that each of them becomes highlighted.
  • 3 Click the Archive button, represented by a folder with a down arrow in the foreground and circled in the accompanying screenshot above.
  • 4 Your message(s) will now be archived, and a confirmation message should appear along with a link labeled Undo – which will revert this change if clicked on.

 

Archiving Emails on an Android or iOS Device

 

Moving messages into your archive is even easier on smartphones or tablets when using the Gmail app. Simply swipe from right to left on a message in your inbox or other folder and it will instantly be archived, assuming that your swiping settings have not been previously modified.

To validate your Gmail swiping settings beforehand, take the steps below.

Android users: From the menu button, take the following path: Settings > General Settings > Gmail default action and ensure that Archive is selected.

iOS users: From the menu button, take the following path: Settings > “account name” > When removing messages, I prefer to…and ensure that Archive is selected.

Muting Gmail Messages

In addition to archiving individual emails, Google offers a similar feature with one key difference. While messages are still moved to the “All Mail” repository when muted, they are not automatically returned to your inbox when someone replies. To mute a message, take the following steps.

Muting Messages on a Computer

 

  • 1 To mute a message on a computer, first access the Gmail interface via your preferred web browser (Google Chrome is recommended).
  • 2 Select the email or emails that you wish to mute by clicking on their accompanying checkbox(es) so that each of them becomes highlighted.
  • 3 Click the More button, found in Gmail’s main toolbar.
  • 4 When the drop-down menu appears, select the Mute option.
  • 5 A confirmation message should now be displayed, letting you know that the conversation has been muted. Click the Undo button to revert this setting.

 

Muting Messages on Android or iOS Devices

  • 1 To mute a message within the Gmail app on a smartphone or tablet, first select the conversation in question.
  • 2 Next, tap the menu button – represented by three vertical dots and located in the upper right-hand corner of the screen.
  • 3 When the pop-out menu appears, select Mute.

 

What best practices do you have for managing your email? Tell us in the comments below!

Tips & Tricks: 6 Gmail tips, tricks, and hacks to help you master your email

 

 

 

By Nicole Gallucci of Mashable

Have you ever accidentally sent a damning email to someone that you intended to save for the rest of time as a draft? Or made a friend audibly gasp at the sight of thousands of unread email notifications on your phone? Perhaps you’ve run out of storage space on your drive entirely and are paying actual money for more. If so, you’re not alone, but you do need some major Gmail guidance.

The first step to mastering Gmail is admitting you’re not that great at it. You’re here reading this so you’ve done that already. Good. The second step is studying this handy list of Gmail tips, tricks, and hacks that I’ve complied just for you. Easy.

These six tips will teach you the ins and outs of un-sending messages, customizing your account, staying in the loop on the latest updates, and more. You’ll be a Gmail show-off making the most of your account before you know it.

 

1. Save some valuable space

There are two types of people in this world: those with zero un-read messages in their inbox and those with thousands.
If you’re a member of the latter group maybe that works for you, or perhaps you’ve simply lost control of your inbox and are now on the verge of losing sleep at night, just praying that an easy way to free up space in your Gmail account existed.
Okay, let’s not get dramatic. Decluttering that mess might seem impossible but it’s doable. We promise.

Search and delete

Gmail search allows you to specifically filter your messages to locate and delete by sender, file size, attachments, YouTube videos, or other links. Simply type a command into the search bar followed by the key words you’re looking for (ex: “from:mashable”) and Gmail will locate all related emails for you to review and potentially delete.

To start, you might consider searching for larger MP3 or video files to delete — but even if you don’t have any specifics in mind definitely make use of the file size search operator. You can type in “larger:3m” to search files over 3MB and so on and so forth. You can also wipe messages by date range. Typing “older_than:5y” will show all messages older than five years ago, which you can then select, trash at once, and pretend they never existed. 👍 Perfect.

If manual search operators aren’t your thing there’s always the more advanced drop-down search menu.

You can find Gmail’s full list of search operators here, along with search methods that may not have even crossed your mind.

2. Enable ‘Undo Send’ and breathe a sigh of relief

Gmail’s potentially life-saving “Undo Send” feature was introduced in 2015 so you’ve probably heard of it, but if you’re not sure how to enable it it’ll unfortunately be useless to you.

To do so, simply click on the settings gear in the upper right-hand corner of your Gmail account. Select “Settings” from the drop-down menu and check the box labeled “Enable Undo Send.” You’re then given the option to set a “send cancellation period” of either 5, 10, 20 or 30 seconds.

Obviously choose 30 seconds, you know, because not everyone always realizes they made a horrible mistake RIGHT AWAY. (Why does a five second option even exist?)
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3. Organize your inbox for maximum efficiency

Are you an email hoarder who refuses to delete messages? That’s okay, but if you’re going to keep thousands of emails you might want to organize them to make things less hectic. Labels and categories are your friends, but they each serve different purposes. Here’s the deal:

Labels:

Labels are sort of like folders, but the good thing is you can add multiple labels to a single email. To choose or create new labels open an email and click the label tab next to the “More” option above the message.
Once selected the labels will show up beside the email subject. Clicking on them will allow you to see all messages with that same label.

Once new labels are made, they ‘ll show up in the menu list on the left hand side of your account where you can edit and color code for extra customization.

 

Categories:

If you want to separate your emails before you open Gmail take advantage of inbox category tabs. These will sort your emails based on subject matter like “Social” or “Promotions,” so not every message shows up on the homepage.

 

To enable inbox categories go to Settings > Inbox and select “Default” inbox type. Then you can choose which categories you want to use, but be aware you’ll have to have less than 250,000 emails in your inbox for it to work

 

 

4. Personalize your account

While you’re staring at Gmail for hours at work don’t you ever wish it would better reflect your personality? Email is boring as hell, so for the love of your tired, strained eyes please take some time to add flair and color to your account.

⭐ All the stars ⭐

In the email world a yellow star generally signifies a message is important, but by utilizing all the stars and symbols Gmail offers you can use the shapes to organize emails into groups.

To choose which stars you have at your disposal go to the Stars section in the Settings tab. You can choose to use one, four, or all 12 symbols. (Don’t forget to save your settings changes at the bottom of the page.)

Starring an email highlights it and includes it in the “Starred” label, but enabling different colored stars makes it even easier to perform specific searches. For example, if you’re looking for emails with purple stars you can type “has:purple-star” in the search bar and voila.

To access the different colored symbols simply continue clicking the yellow star until you reach the one you want.

Custom themes:

Anyone who’s ever been to a themed party knows themes are a blast, and in this case they have the power to transform an otherwise dull but very necessary communication tool into a low-key enjoyable thing to look at. To choose a theme you can browse some of the lovely options under the drop-down settings gear (island getaway, crunchy leaves, light blue, etc.) or upload your own photo to get even more personal.

 

5. Reclaim your time

No one wants to spend their day navigating Gmail, so here are some hot time-saving tips that will let you get back to Twitter, Facebook, and uh, work, I guess, sooner.

 

Send personalized mass emails

Ain’t nobody got time to individually personalize the exact same email for multiple people… until now. Thanks to a nifty Chrome extension called Mail Merge for Gmail you can send personalized emails to a mass group of recipients at one time.
After downloading the add-on simply create a spreadsheet in Google Drive, then go to Add-ons > Mail Merge and Scheduler > Create Merge Template to make the spreadsheet merge-able. To add recipients either import from your Google Contacts on input the info manually.

Learn more about using Mail Merge here.

Schedule emails like a magician

Another great thing about Mail Merge is it has a built-in scheduler that you can use to send out emails at later dates or times.

Boomerang for Gmail is another service that lets you schedule emails to send ahead of time, and is especially great if you want to get a jump-start on work or simply want to ensure you don’t forget to send something. You can also set reminders for yourself to follow up on messages, which is something everyone could benefit from.

Learn those sweet sweet keyboard shortcuts

Hotkeys have the potential to change your Gmail life, but before you master them make sure they’re all turned on by going to Settings > Keyboard Shortcuts > On.
Once that’s done you’ll have access to dozens of helpful key combinations that will make formatting text, chatting, navigating your account, participating in Hangouts, and much more seem like a breeze.

Google has a complete list of keyboard shortcuts, but you can also type a “?” when Gmail is open to make another list appear.

6. Stay up to date on Gmail news

Gmail is always improving and changing, so one of the best ways to keep up is to test new features while they’re still in beta.

You may be unaware of Gmail Labs, which allows you to do just that. It’s the hub for all things in the experimental stage, which can occasionally become permanent parts of the mailing system. You can test out and enable all sorts of fun features by visiting the Labs tab in Settings. Just don’t get too attached because they could wind up disappearing on you.

And if you’re really afraid of getting Gmail FOMO you can follow Gmail’s official blog for the latest news and updates. (Also, maybe consider closing your laptop and hanging out with some friends IRL because Gmail FOMO should not be a ~thing~).

 

Do you have any tips for using Gmail? Tell us about them in the comments below!

How to: use iOS Mail’s auto unsubscribe feature

 

By Charlie Sorrel of Cult of Mac

If you find yourself on a mailing list that you either never signed up for, or just got sick of, then iOS Mail has you covered. The app has a built-in feature that detects emails from mailing lists, and offers to unsubscribe from them right there, without you having to visit the sender’s site and hunt for the unsubscribe option yourself, like some kind of spam-lackey.

Using Mail’s auto-unsubscribe feature

When Mail detects an email from a mailing list, it adds a banner at the top of the email offering to unsubscribe for you:

“This message is from a mailing list,” it says, with a blue Unsubscribe button underneath. Tap that, ands Mail goes to work:

 

It achieves this amazing feat by sending a reply to the sender. If everything works as planned, and the sender of the newsletter is a good internet citizen, you will be removed from their list.

As you can see from the various screenshots around this post, the trick works on both the iPhone and the iPad. It doesn’t currently work on the Mac, at least not on mine.

Manual and automatic alternatives to unsubscribe

Even if Mail fails to spot a mailing-list mail, you can often take care of it yourself. Just scroll to the very bottom of the email in question, and look for the word “unsubscribe,” usually written in teeny-tiny letters, and in pale gray on white (or an equally invisible color combo). Tap it, and you will usually be taken to a page which tells you that your attempt to unsubscribe was a success.

 

Sometimes, you’ll need to check a box to actually unsubscribe, which is going to far in my opinion. Either way, be aware that if a genuine spam mail got through, then tapping an unsubscribe link might verify you as a live human to the spammer.

The other option is to use a third-party service to manage your mail for you.

SaneBox

If an email newsletter keeps coming back, or if you’re getting spammy mails from PR folks who refuse to let you unsubscribe, then you could try SaneBox or something similar. Sanebox automatically files your mails into sensible categories, and filters out the real crap. It also has a great feature called Sane Black Hole. It shows up as a regular mailbox in your email client, but when you add an email to that folder, SaneBox takes note and nukes any future email from that address. It’s a kind of email blacklist, and it’s 100% effective in my experience.

I get almost no spam these days, so unwanted newsletters are the biggest annoyance in my inbox. Or rather, in my Sane Later mailbox. Having a way to quickly unsubscribe is golden. Hopefully it’ll come to the Mac in a future version of macOS.

How do you manage your unwanted email? Tell us your best practices in the comments below!

App of the Week: 10 Powerful Apps To Help You Manage Email Like A Boss

 

Ladies,

Of all the questions I’ve gotten over the 10 years I was with Apple, the most consistent questions and/or tech support issues came from email. Managing email is the new daily headache of the 21st century. It can be confusing, enlightening, and maddening all at once. Luckily, our smart phones and computers have resources to help ease our headaches with email mail management apps. I can speak to the ease of use of Spark and AirMail, but the others in this list were new to me. I think if any of these apps can help ease your email pains, they’re worth trying out.

By Tomas Laurinavicius

Email is an inherent part of our daily life. It’s hard to imagine a week or even a day without it. We use it for regular communication, marketing, negotiation, business and more. But it can get distracting and destructive.

Most of the time your inbox gets overloaded because of poor email management habits. Luckily, technology today is designed to help you adopt effective management habits and process email faster with smart filtering, artificial intelligence, and automation.

Here’s a list of 10 powerful apps to help you manage email like a boss. I’m sure you’ll find something that suits you.

 

Spark


Spark is a fast and smart app for your email. It understands which of your emails are the most important and pops them on the top of the list. There are three categories your email are divided into Personal, Newsletters, and Notifications. Can be used on Mac and iOS.

Pricing: Free

ProtonMail


ProtonMail is a security-focused tool to manage your email faster. It offers great data security and a clean, modern and user-friendly interface. It also has an end-to-end encryption feature that ensures no one, not even the creators can read your emails. Available for the Web, iOS, and Android.

Pricing: Free

EasilyDo Mail


EasilyDo Mail is an innovative app with a built-in assistant. You can use an extremely fast search (by keyword or contact) and easily unsubscribe from annoying newsletters. It also lets you organize your emails into categories. Available for iOS and Android.

Pricing: Free

SaneBox


SaneBox is an app with a built-in auto filter. The auto filter recognizes which emails are important, secondary and spam. You can use this app by connecting it to your Google or Yahoo account. It also offers such cool features like reminders, automatic attachments and much more.

 

Pricing: From $7.00/month


Airmail

Airmail is a fast and intuitive app for email management. It supports Gmail, Exchange EWS, IMAP, and POP3. By using this app, you can enjoy the advantages of 3D touch, custom swaps, bulk editing and more. Available for Mac and iOS.

Pricing: $4.99

Newton Mail


Newton Mail is a simple app available for iOS, Mac, and Android. An awesome feature that this app offers is email delay function that lets you schedule emails for later. It also offers a connection with other apps like Evernote, Trello, Zendesk, Asana, Salesforce and has a built-in calendar.

 

Pricing: Free for 14 days, after that $49.99/year

Dispatch

Dispatch is an email management app for iOS that lets you take care of business on the go. It has a great swiping feature that deletes, archives or marks your emails as spam. With this powerful tool, you can also create short snippets to answer common emails within a minute.

 

Pricing: $6.99

Boxer


Boxer is another email management tool for iOS and Android. This app has an integrated smart calendar, lets you create contacts and connects with other apps that store your contact lists. Boxer supports Gmail, Yahoo, Exchange, Outlook, iCloud and AOL.

 

Pricing: Free

Unroll.me


Unroll.me is an app focused on decluttering, organizing and categorizing. It lists all the subscriptions for you so you can easily unsubscribe from the undesired ones. It also has much more cool features like designing your own Rollup with your favorite subscriptions. Available for the Web and iOS only.

 

Pricing: Free

 

Alto Mail


Alto Mail is a mail organizing app that lets you keep all your accounts in one place. It offers a great feature called “Stacks” that helps you organize emails. Compatible with AOL, Gmail, Outlook, Yahoo, iCould and Exchange. Available for the Web, iOS, and Android.

 

Pricing: Free

Your Turn

How do you fight your inbox overload? Share your favorite apps in the comments or tweet me at @theblondebyte16 or to Tomas @tomaslau.

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